Posts tagged ‘wither’

July 8th, 2011

Characters I’d Name My Sons After

by Madeleine Rex

The second installment in baby name posts! As I said before in my previous post, Characters I’d Name My Daughters After, I stole this idea from Audrey over at holes In My brain (a blog you should definitely read even if you don’t care what we want to name our children).

Characters I’d Name My Sons After:

Walter
Walter Blythe from the Anne of Green Gables series. Yet again another Anne character I actually intend to name a child after. I know Walter might not appear to be the most… attractive name to begin with, but read the books. Read the books and love them. Walter Blythe is someone I have a particular connection to – I love him so much. I can’t say more without revealing his fate, but he’s absolutely, unarguably inspiring.

Jem
Jem is also one of Anne Shirley’s sons. I’m not planning on naming a child after him because that would be overkill, but I love the name. It’s short for James, obviously, but the nickname is so endearing. He’s a brave, silly, and fantastic little boy who grows into an even more valiant and impressive young man.

Henry
Henry from Miranda Kenneally’s upcoming Catching Jordan. I love Henry. He’s beautiful with all his flaws and quirks. He’s the sort of character that immediately feels like a best friend you would love to have in real life, and sometimes it kills me that these fantastic characters can never love me back. Henry’s a gem folks, and I can’t wait for you all to have the opportunity to read Catching Jordan!

Wes
Wes from The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen (Review). The Truth About Forever was the first Dessen book I read, and I can assure you that Wes makes that book. Even amidst the terribly fun cast of the book, he stands out as the sort of boy any girl would be thrilled to have. I think he prompted me to say sa-wooon for the first time in my life. Need I say anything more?

Linden
Linden from Wither by Lauren DeStefano (Review). This name is so odd and beautiful at the same time. Plus, there are these mysterious undertones to it in my ears due to the mysterious nature of his character. I never know what to think of him, but I do know that I’m inclined to like him. You all need to read it and tell me what you think!

June 29th, 2011

“You’re still reading dystopian?”

by Madeleine Rex

I can’t tell you how many times my mom’s asked me this question.

Now, my mom’s not much of a reader herself (this may be hard to believe, but she really is far too busy to read), but she does host a book club with me and forces herself to listen to my bookish jabbering. Therefore, she’s heard plenty about various dystopian societies. I can’t seem to quit leaping at dystopian novels, despite the fact that many of them are rather similar.

Why?

There’s simply something fascinating about a world that is a twisted and demented version of the one we’re living in. Even without the elements of fantasy, dystopian worlds manage to be just as fantastical, but in a more relatable way. The more connections I can make between our world and the one in the book, and the easier it is to understand the path that was taken to get from one to the other, the more mesmerizing and terrifying the dystopian world is. A few miscalculations, a few conniving people, a few natural disasters, and we’re there, living in a world even more dysfunctional than the one we’re living in now.

However, I’d have to say that the reason I haven’t had my dystopian fix is the same one that motivates me to read almost anything: characters. No matter what genre, and no matter how bland the world, a colorful cast of characters can steal my heart. All I’m really asking for is the opportunity to love a few more people – to make friends and enjoy their company. When I read, my ultimate desire is to be invested in the lives of fascinating people. Dystopian is a genre that accommodates intriguing worlds, horrific realities, and, if the book is good, characters with whom I can fall in love.

There are many irresistible dystopian novels out there, and their strengths vary. Some are written by adept and talented authors whose prose enchants me. Others are set in worlds so corrupt and abominable that I can’t help but read them and savor the horror. And the best of them are homes to people I adore.

Here are a few dystopian books that I’ve enjoyed and recommend, particularly to those that are skeptical about the value and appeal of the dystopian genre:


Divergent by Veronica Roth [5/5]


Wither by Lauren DeStefano [5/5] (Review)


Delirium by Lauren Oliver [5/5] (Review)


Matched by Ally Condie [5/5] (Review)


The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins [Can I say 10/5?]


Awaken by Katie Kacvinsky [4/5] (Review)

What are you still doing here? Shouldn’t you be reading?

May 21st, 2011

Fictional Characters I’d Name My Daughter After

by Madeleine Rex

Isn’t this a fantastic topic? I’ve robbed it from Audrey. I have definitely spent time contemplating this. After all, I’m a girl – it’s natural to daydream about baby names. Even more importantly, I’m a reader – so it’s natural to adore fictional characters to the point of ridiculousness. Hence, this post.

Fictional Characters I’d Name My Daughter After:

Anne
Anne Shirley from the Anne of Green Gables series. I actually plan on naming a girl after her. I absolutely love everything about her and love everything about the series and love everything about the people and have I mentioned I love her? See? I adore her to the point that I’ll throw punctuation and sentence structure right out the window. This is serious stuff.

Macy
Macy from The Truth About Forever. If I were being more literal here, all the names would be from books written in the 1800s. I love the old-fashioned ones. However, Macy is one of the more modern names that I really like. It’s unique and has a short-and-sweet quality to it that appeals to me. Plus, The Truth About Forever is an irresistible book.

Lina
Another name I absolutely want to use for a child someday! It’s short for Caroline, and I first came across it when attempting to read Shirley by Charlotte Bronte. I’ve loved the two other books I’ve read of Charlotte’s, but I couldn’t seem to get through this one. All the same, great and unusual name!

Margo
Margo from Paper Towns by John Green. Need I say more? Isn’t the name “John Green” synonymous with “never-ending amounts of awesomeness” by now? What? No? That’s not in your thesaurus? Well, they’re synonymous in my scrambled brain, and Margo is awesome by association. Plus, it’s a neat name.

Astrid
Astrid, the wild flapper from Bright Young Things. There’s also a girl named Astrid on one of my favorite TV shows, “Fringe,” and they’re both inspiring, entertaining, and absolutely lovable.

Honorable Mentions (the following are great characters but have names I’m not crazy about): Andi (Revolution), Alex (Revolution), Rhine (Wither), Francesca (Saving Francesca), Frankie (The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks), and Mia (If I Stay/Where She Went).

I would certainly read any posts similar to this one, should any of you decide to write one! If you do, let me know in the comments, and I’ll take a look. Happy Apocalypse!